A poor lookout

I doubt I will ever wholly approve of anyone in the role of Information Commissioner until the Ministry of Justice comes to its senses and gives the job to me. However, I have always much preferred the verve and acerbity of Christopher Graham to the overcautious lawyerly approach of his predecessor, Richard Thomas. I don’t believe that Thomas would have been willing to enforce in the way Graham has managed (albeit that Mr Graham’s approach is fixated on one part of the public sector, and one part of one data protection principle), and he was nowhere near as good on the media stage – important for anyone in the role.

However, Graham’s interview with the Independent – timed presumably to coincide with the extension of his tenure to the legal maximum of 7 years –   was dispiriting.

Some of the flaws in the article are not attributed directly to Graham – the text describes action taken under PECR as an attempt to ‘prosecute’, which is incorrect because it was a civil action. It’s entirely possible that this was the Indie’s mistake but it doesn’t help anyone to understand what the ICO does (presumably one aim of doing the interview) and it should have been corrected. But when the text later describes the Commissioner as having a ‘right to compulsory audit’ local government, this is also wrong. The ICO can do mandatory audits of Government and there was a consultation to give it powers to do the same for the NHS. Compulsory audits for local government aren’t on the table. This is a mistake that Christopher Graham has made before, so I suspect it came from him, but it’s also a sign of the limit on the current Commissioner’s ambitions. Where is the evidence that he wants such powers?

Something that can definitely be attributed to Mr Graham is his crass, discourteous description of local government as ‘hopeless’. Every council delegate at next week’s ICO Data Protection Officer’s Conference should make it their business to challenge him on it, and frankly, councils should stop cowering in front of the ICO, stop reporting incidents to his office and stop cooperating with its entirely voluntary audits unless they actively want one. The weekend’s big data protection story was the theft of data from Aviva and subsequent sale to claims management companies. Graham has done an admirable job of agitating for bigger fines for data theft, but part of the ICO’s beloved seventh principle requires organisations to take steps to prevent ‘unlawful processing’. It’s not just about catching the thieves afterwards, but attempting to thwart them in advance. I am certain that the ICO doesn’t have a clue whether the financial services industry is exemplary or hopeless in this regard. Mr Graham hasn’t even asked for the mandatory audit powers to find out. Councils are an easy target because they constantly move data around and FOI means that, unlike the private sector, they can’t keep their dirty laundry hidden. The ‘hopeless’ remark may have been off-the-cuff, but it suggests knowledge that his office hasn’t put the hours in to possess. Besides, Mr Graham is a journalist and would know that such a remark would make the final edit, so it’s an insulting message he wanted to send. I’d love to know what word he uses to describe the ICO’s non-existent enforcement of the FOI Act, to the extent that some government departments openly thumb their noses at his office, and thus at him.

More of a concern is Graham’s remark that ““People have been challenging me on the bus about care.data. That’s the talking point but Snowden hasn’t been, which is kind of a surprise.” There are two things that bother me about this. Firstly, it suggests that Graham is out of touch with the public. It is not the ICO’s job to represent the public, it is their job to ensure that data controllers comply with the law (technically, the courts have more of a role in upholding individual rights than the ICO does). But nevertheless, Graham’s expectation that people would be button-holing him about the security services rather than the NHS is a tad elitist. The NSA’s spying on us all is obnoxious, but care.data is much more likely to have a direct effect on the man on the 130 bus to Wilmslow. More crucially, however, Snowden is not really on Graham’s territory. There is a very broad exemption in the DPA that you may not agree with, but which puts any activity ‘necessary’ for national security completely outside the DPA, and off the ICO’s radar. If the Commissioner was more concerned with matters that are more directly covered by his legislation, he might have avoided giving such inaccurate advice on care.data and pseudonymisation when on the BBC Breakfast sofa. It’s interesting that the Commissioner admits that his office failed to persuade NHS England to write to all citizens about care.data, which suggests that the stakeholder engagement approach doesn’t bear fruit.

Most depressing of all, however, is Graham’s complaint about the loss of the Scottish Borders appeal. Borders won their appeal because the ICO failed to establish a crucial part of the test that the law has set for them. The ICO has to show that it is “likely” that the breach – in this case, the failure to have a proper contract in place with a company scanning and disposing of records – would cause damage or distress. The ICO’s approach in Borders (and others) was to assume.  For the ICO, lost records = identity theft. The civil burden of proof is lower than the criminal one, but it should not simply be what a clever man reckons. I made an FOI request for any evidence of the ICO’s claim that a lost passport number leads to identity theft, and they admitted that they don’t have any. If they propose to fine an organisation £250,000, the ICO ought to have more than an assumption and crucially, the law requires that they have more. But Mr Graham doesn’t appear to understand that: he complains: “I couldn’t prove that someone of malicious intent had picked up all this personal information and was going to be doing people down”. This is not why the case was lost (although it’s true that he couldn’t prove that).

The Information Commissioner is a single appointee helped by hundreds of staff, but nevertheless, a single appointee who is given all of the powers and obligations. Mr Graham must understand how his powers work. Papers spilling out of a bin isn’t a breach. It’s an incident. The Commissioner cannot issue a CMP for papers spilling out of a bin, or any other incident in itself. In Borders, he had to establish that there was a breach: there was no contract, so job done. Then he had to show that incidents like the papers in the bin were foreseeable and likely to cause damage or distress. People sometimes don’t have proper contracts with long-standing and trusted suppliers. Is it likely that this will lead to the supplier dumping paper records in a recycling bin? Will this lead to damage and distress? Honestly, I don’t know, but that’s what Mr Graham couldn’t prove to the satisfaction of the Tribunal and frankly, I think the test should be rigorous if the stakes are as high as a quarter of a million pounds. The Deputy Commissioner David Smith was chided by the Tribunal at the time for focussing too much on the incident, and here the Commissioner makes the same fundamental mistake.

Most of the other matters I’ve raised here are presentational and you might say trivial; this final one isn’t. The role of the Commissioner is to be a figurehead, a public face to play up the big picture, but if Mr Graham wants to complain about losing Tribunal cases, he has to know why he lost, and I’m not sure from the evidence that he does. If he, and the office as a whole don’t learn the lessons, the important powers they were given under the tenure of his hesitant predecessor will become worthless. He’s still a more impressive figure than his predecessor, and almost certainly the most successful holder of the office so far. But this interview shows a Commissioner sniping at everyone but unsure of the details: not hopeless, but equally, not inspiring.

Comments

  1. ALAN M DRANSFIELD says:

    GOD HELP US ALL IF YOU GET THE JOB

  2. ALAN M DRANSFIELD says:

    BTW .I forgot to tell you, the Court of Appeal Kicked me into touch.
    Quel surprise

  3. Derek O'Connor says:

    The ICO Conference should be an interesting one then?
    I totally agree that there is a huge difference between an data incident and a data breach? If it is established that there is a breach then there is a likiehood that damage/distress could occur, but thats does not mean it will occur – the situation can still be recovered with no damage/distress caused to anyone (except the data controllers stress levels). The Borders were brave enough to challange the ICO and were rewarded in my opinion with the correct result.

    • I agree – I think CMPs are an appropriate tool for serious cases, but not ones based on knee-jerk assumptions. An enforcement notice or undertaking would often be an appropriate way of sorting out data protection breaches, especially in the public sector. I would prefer to see more CMPs levied on the private sector, whose attention is more focussed on the bottom line.

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  1. […] that. The Information Commissioner’s recent interview with the Independent suggests that he doesn’t properly understand how his powers work, and the loss of the Scottish Borders CMP appeal (a CMP I don’t believe should ever have been […]

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