Injury Lawyers in Boston

Boston Personal Injury Law Firm Have you been injured in a mishap that was another person’s fault? If so, get the Stone Injury Lawyers in your corner. At Jason Stone Injury Lawyers, we fight for complete and also reasonable payment for injured people throughout Boston. Our competent Boston injury lawyers recognize exactly how heavy your losses can be after a crash– not just economically, but likewise physically as well as mentally. Our work is to make certain that whoever is in charge of your injuries is held accountable for their wrongdoing. The aid you require is right nearby. Phone Call Stone Injury Lawyers or call us online for a cost-free consultation. Contents 1 What is Personal Injury Legislation? 2 We Take Care Of Injury Cases Just Like Yours 2.1 Cars And Truck Mishap Lawyer 2.2 Vehicle Mishap Attorney 2.3 Bike Accident Attorney 2.4 Pedestrian Accident Lawyer 2.5 Bicycle Crash Attorney 2.6 Bus Crash Lawyer 2.7 Electric Mobility Scooter Crash Attorney 2.8 Slip as well as Loss Attorney 2.9 Dog Attack Lawyer 2.10 Construction Crash Attorney 2.11 Elevator Crash Lawyer 2.12 Boating Accidents 2.13 Item Obligation Lawyer 3 A Boston Personal Injury Lawyer Will Look For Justice for You What is

Read More »

Financial Recovery in a Personal Injury Settlement

The legal definition of personal injury varies greatly depending on who you ask. A personal injury attorney is a lawyer that focuses his or her professional practice on the defense of those who have been the direct victims of another person’s wrongful action. Personal injury cases can include injuries, medical malpractice, work related illnesses and injuries, and wrongful death. It can also encompass slander, malicious prosecution, invasion of privacy, defamation, as well as civil wrongs, such as battery, false arrest, dog bites, etc. It is the intent of a personal injury attorney to seek justice for those that have been harmed either physically or emotionally through the negligence of another person or business entity. If you think you have a case, contact a personal injury lawyer today.   If you believe that you have fallen victim to this wrongful act of another party, your first step should be to contact a San Diego personal injury law firm. There are several ways to do this. One way is to employ an attorney that you already know and trust. Another way is to employ an attorney that you have only heard of through the grapevine. However, if you cannot locate an attorney

Read More »

Going Unnoticed

  Last week, I came across an interview with Elizabeth Denham on a Canadian website called The Walrus that was published in April. There are some interesting nuggets – Denham seems to out herself as a Remainer in the third paragraph (a tad awkward given that she has only enforced on the other side) and also it turns out that the Commissioner has framed pictures of herself taking on Facebook in her office. More important is the comparison she draws between her Canadian jobs and her current role: “That’s why I like being where I am now,” she says, settling herself at a boardroom table. “To actually see people prosecuted.” Denham probably wasn’t thinking of the run of legitimate but low-key prosecutions of nosy admin staff and practice managers which her office has carried out in recent months, which means she was up to her old tricks of inaccurately using the language of crime and prosecution to describe powers that are civil (or more properly, administrative). Since GDPR came in, she’s even less likely to prosecute than before, given that she no longer has the power to do so for an ignored enforcement or information notice. I don’t know whether she genuinely doesn’t understand how her powers work

Read More »

Taking the piss

  On page 74 of the Information Commissioner’s newly published Annual Report, you can find the welcome news that the ICO reduced the amount of water in flushing toilets and the timings of auto flushing in urinals. Sadly, the expansion of the organisation’s footprint in Wilmslow, due to swelling numbers of staff, has led to an increase in overall emissions (insert your own joke). There is an abundance of other information about other environmental issues, including paper consumption and car journeys, Strangely, if you look for information about one of the landmark events of UK Data Protection in 2019 – 2020, there is no sign. In December 2019, the Information Commissioner issued its first ever penalty under the General Data Protection Regulation against a company called Doorstep Dispensaree. Several pages of the report are taken up illustrating “The Year in Summary”, and the only thing mentioned for December is the launch of a consultation about AI. It’s not that the ICO had so many things to report on; one of the highlights for June 2019 was “The Information Commissioner makes a speech at a G20 side event in Tokyo“. Odd that an event which is very much the ‘only invited to

Read More »

Goodbye Silver Service, Say Hello to Lead

  The Information Commissioner has two powers to make FOI and the EIRs work, and a backup power to facilitate the other two. They’re found in FOI but apply to both. Under Section 50, the Commissioner can resolve a complaint about an individual FOI / EIR complaint by issuing a Decision Notice, which determines whether the public authority’s response was partially or wholly right or wrong. Under Section 52, the Information Commissioner can issue an Enforcement Notice, which allows the ICO to order a public authority to put right any failing, and unlike S50 is not linked to an individual complaint. Logically, the Enforcement Notice makes sense as a tool to deal with consistent or corporate FOI failings, as anything identified during an individual complaint can be resolved in a Decision Notice. As regular readers will know, the Enforcement Notice exists in name only as the Commissioner has not issued one since 2010 and seems effectively to have retired it. In the middle is the S51 Information Notice, which is more specific. Most FOI / EIR complaints are resolved through protracted but willing correspondence, but occasionally an organisation won’t play along and so S51 allows the Commissioner to demand information. It’s

Read More »

Lateral Thinking

  Last week, I wrote a blog about the ‘personal data agency’ Yo-Da, outlining my concerns about their grandiose claims, the lack of detail about how their service works and their hypocritical decision to ignore a subject access request I made to them. Predictably, this led to further online tussles between myself and Benjamin Falk, the company’s founder and ‘chief talker’. As a result of our final conversation, Yo-Da has effectively disappeared from the internet. Clearly, I touched a nerve. Yo-Da’s website made concrete claims about what their service did, and in fact had done. There were testimonials from satisfied users, and three case studies. Although it was clear that the service wasn’t operating yet, the testimonials were unambiguous: here is what Yo-Da has done for me. There was no hint that they were fictional, nothing to suggest that the service couldn’t do what the site said. “Yo-Da systematically and automatically exercises your data rights” + “Use Yo-Da to ask any company in Europe to delete your personal information” User ‘Samuel’ claimed “Now I go to Yo-Da, search for the company whose (sic) been breached, and with 1-click find out what is happening with my personal information”, while ‘Nathan’ said “Yo-Da was

Read More »
Return to top of page